Indy Calls Out Sick

Indy decided to give me a bit of a scare over the past few days.  I had had a very busy weekend working and I guess he felt he needed more attention.  I had gone to the barn Saturday night and he was his normal self.  Sunday night, however, he hadn’t finished his dinner grain, quite unusual for him.  It had been pouring rain all day, remnants of Hurricane Matthew, and the horses had stayed in for the day.  Indy pawed a little and was stretching so I took him and Shady to the indoor to run around some.  Indy started off a little quiet – standing confused while his mother tore around the indoor acting like a child.  He then ran around with her some as well, kicking up his heels and getting some good energy out.  We walked for a bit to cool down and each had a thorough grooming.  Indy then finished his dinner and resumed eating his hay.  I thought perhaps he had had a little gas buildup from being stuck inside all day, not moving.

I headed to the barn mid afternoon Monday after catching up on a lot of work leftover from the weekend.  Indy had eaten his breakfast, drank, and finished his dinner hay from the night before.  Barn staff said he was quiet going out in the morning, but otherwise normal.  When I went out to get him however, he told me otherwise.

He walked up to me, sluggish, and put his lovely head into my arms.  He gave a couple sad little paws at the ground with his hoof, trying everything he could to communicate that something was wrong. Walking into the barn he was slow and kept his nose as close to in my hand as he could. He would stop and stand, taking a break, then continue after a pat.

I took his temp as soon as we were in.  104. The normal horse temp, in case you don’t know, is 99-101. 104 is terrifying to me.  Three of Indy’s hooves were quite warm to the touch.  I don’t know why the fourth one wasn’t, he must have been standing in a cool area with it or something.  I ran for the oral Banamine and, much to Indy’s dismay, squirted it down his throat.  We then slowly walked down to the clinic.  I wanted to do bloodwork as soon as possible, as it often takes a bit to get the results back.

Thankfully, I have wonderful friends that work in the clinic who were extremely supportive and quickly jumped in to help.  They drew blood to send out to a lab and also some to take a look at there in the clinic.  The good news was that his bloodwork looked normal – nothing elevated other than his SAA levels.  SAA refers to a protein which is made in the liver.  It is part of the acute line of defense, part of the first stage of response to inflammation, trauma, stress, etc.  It seemed as though we were catching something in the early stages but we weren’t sure of what yet.

While all we had for a symptom was sudden onset of fever, anaplasmosis was a likely possibility in all of our minds.  Shady had had it a year ago, from the one lousy tick I found on her all year.  She too had only exhibited a fever, with lethargy and diminished appetite as a side effect of the fever.  She had actually been able to beat it on her own, without medication, only Banamine to keep the fever at bay.  We decided to start him on Oxytetracycline to get a start in treating it.

I stayed with Indy until late night, waiting for the Banamine to kick in and for him to start feeling more comfortable. I scolded myself over and over again for not taking his temp Sunday night.  I had been so sure he just needed to move, and maybe he did.  His feet hadn’t felt warm at all, he had returned to his normal self after running around some, and was himself in the morning.  Maybe he had just been starting to have some physiological changes.

His temp dropped down to 101 and he returned to being himself.  I felt that the Banamine and Oxytet were doing their job and headed home for the night.

The next morning my friend texted me and said his temp was back up to 104. I raced to the barn and found the staff at his paddock, explaining how he “looked drunk”.  He was weak and looked tired. Looking at his stall from the night before you wouldn’t have guessed.  He had eaten his breakfast, eaten his hay, and pooped normal, though a little dry.  The only sign of worry was that he hadn’t drank as much as normal.

We headed back down to the clinic for IV Banamine and also to submit some manure for testing too.  We hung out in the clinic for most of the day, me sitting in his stall for company and to keep an eye on his food and water intake.  He found my iPad to be quite fascinating.

His temp was down and he was feeling himself by early afternoon.  It was a beautiful day outside, so I put him back out with his best bud.  He did get a drink, played some bitey face, and then napped in the sun, trying to rest his chin on Cal’s back.  I headed home for a late lunch and returned a couple hours later.

Upon coming back he was getting lethargic again.  I hoped he was just tired from a long day of battling whatever it is.  Sadly, I saw that his temp was rising again.  As much as I hated to do it, we gave him more Banamine and his dose of Oxytet.  The Banamine dosage we were using was less than full strength in an attempt to control the fever with minimal amounts.  It was back to the waiting game.

By 9pm his temp was down to 101.3.  He was eating well, still not drinking a lot, and laying down to rest often.  I actually had given him his dinner “in bed” so to speak, as he was laying peacefully but really wanted to eat. Some people would have said not to feed him, but he was passing manure normally and I thought it best to keep his strength up.  His hay is always soaked and I soaked his chopped alfalfa to at least get some more water in him.

I left him to rest while I had dinner and showered.  At 11:30pm I got a call from the woman doing night check that his temp was up again to 104 and he was cold.  I grabbed some warm clothes and headed back, for what I knew would be a long night.  Driving up I began to get really worried; why wasn’t the Banamine keeping the fever down longer? Why has the Oxytet not kicked in? What is wrong with my boy???

One of the interns met me at the barn and we gave Indy a different antipyretic that isn’t an NSAID and has less negative effects on the GI tract.  It would take a little longer, but hopefully last longer and be more gentle.  It was a little too soon to give him more Banamine anyway, and it clearly was not helping too much!

I settle into my chair with his door partially open so we could see each other and chat.  He would poke his head out and see what TV show I was watching or try to help me write an email.  He would lay down, nap, get up, eat, and repeat.  While he was definitely uncomfortable, he wasn’t acting colicky or as if in a lot of pain.  I resisted the urge to check his temp every five minutes and resorted to feeling his feet.  Those are a pretty good indicator of his temp.

Maybe it was the exhaustion, or perhaps the cold, or maybe it really happened.  Whatever it was, at about 4am Indy looked at me and I knew it was over. I swear he got up, looked me in the eye, sighed contentedly and said “it’s over, I’m good, you can go home and rest now.” His temp was creeping down, then at 102.8. Still high, but it finally was breaking.  He got a drink, turned to eat, and dismissed me with a swish of his tail.  I went home feeling relieved and safe.

I awoke to a text from my friends saying that it had taken two of them to take my “wild” horse’s temp.  He wasn’t being too naughty, rather just politely saying “you can stay out of my bum now, thanks.” His temp was down to 100.3 and he was himself.

Since that 4am moment he has returned to normal, with a low temp, good appetite, and he is back to being a good drinker.  Of course, now that it is over, we got the lab results back.  Before I share the diagnosis, I would love to hear what you think it could have been, based on our experience.  My next blog post will be all about the disease!

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Back to normal

 

Indy’s First Show – Preperation

Last weekend Indy and I both got to experience new things together.  I had entered him in the Future Event Horse competition – something I had pushed hard to have. Long story short, Area 1 (New England and New York) hasn’t had something for the young horses in a while, due to lack of entries.  I began rallying fellow eventers to have the event, recognizing how good an experience it is for the youngsters, and for the selfish reason of wanting something for Indy to do.  Well, as luck would have it, I ran into an acquaintance of mine whom I had worked with years ago when helping to organize the UNH horse trials.  It just so happened that he was organizing an event at a venue we had been looking at to host.  After much discussion, he told me if I could get 12 total entries we would be on. We spread the word, kept reminding people (nagging) and on the day of the show we had 25 entries.  The biggest class turned out to be the Indy’s (yearling) division.

Having never done this myself I too had a lot to learn.  Thankfully, Indy and I have done a lot together already.  His only “show” experience was when he was 7 weeks old and went to his breed inspection.  That seems like an eternity ago.

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Indy at his breed inspection

 

After studying the website for instructions and asking friends, we began to practice the triangle.  Indy would be expected to walk a triangle, each side being 15 meters long, and then trot a triangle with 30 meter sides.  It is important to show the judge relaxed, free flowing gaits.  The triangle is walked and trotted to the right, putting myself on the outside.  Teaching Indy to turn away from me, and not to keep floating forward, took some practice, but he picked it up quickly enough.  He did find it quite fun that we were running around “playing”.  I, on the other hand, found myself quite out of shape.  Indy, now standing at 15.2 (most of that being legs) is hard to keep up with!

Other show prep work had already been done.  Indy is at the point where I clipped his muzzle while he was on the crossties. He thinks clipping is great now; he seems to like the feel of the clipper vibrations against his muzzle and leans right into it.   (See Clipper Training with Indy)

He loads on the trailer like a pro. Every time the is a trailer hooked up at the barn I put him on it. Baths? No problem.  Wearing leg wraps (for shipping)? No problem.  He’s really been pretty well exposed to everything.

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“Duck face” selfies in the trailer….Indy is horrified that I am embarrassing him….

Other than practicing the triangle, we went for long walks, often times ponying along next to Shady.  Not only did this help expose him to new places on the trails, but it also helped to condition him a little.  Indy looks fabulous – lean with some muscle, in good weight, with a beautiful neck and the beginnings of a top line.

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Indy looking amazing!

The only thing we could not practice was the actual show atmosphere.  Thankfully, I had convinced a friend that she too should show her horse at the same competition, though she would show on Saturday and Indy Friday, meaning we would stable overnight.  It was too far of a drive (4.5 hours) to do it all in one day.  Had she not been going, I would have brought Shady.  It would not have been fair for him to go all that way himself; he would have been pretty scared and alone.  I could have never done that to him.

So, all prepped and as ready as we could be, Indy was off to his next big adventure.

More pre-surgery

I need to play a little more catch up!  Tonight I will sit down and put together a new blog post about the actual surgery.

First though, I wanted to share some more of our pre-surgery work because I am so proud of my little (big) guy.

I started putting standing wraps on him in order to get him used to the wraps he will have on after his surgery.  I had my boyfriend hold him while I slowly put them on his hind legs.  As you can see from the below video, he strolled off without an issue.  Most horses would be picking their legs up high and hopping around, or shaking their legs trying to get it off.  He didn’t even seem to notice!

We then spent a lot of time just strolling around outside, since the weather is cooperating this week.  He will be on stall rest for three weeks following the surgery, so I wanted him to get out as much as possible for now.  He was very curious this week, and I encouraged that.  Where he wanted to go and investigate, we went (as long as he wasn’t pulling me to get there, he still needed to have his manners!)

In particular, he wanted to go say hi to any horses he could, of course.

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He’s a social butterfly

I was away for work on Wednesday, but my friends brought him down to the clinic for me.  His surgery was Thursday morning, and he couldn’t eat anything that morning.  We figured it would be best for him to be in the clinic overnight.  That way, when the barn was getting fed and turned out, Indy wouldn’t be sad and feeling ignored in his stall.

They reported back that he was a perfect gentleman for his additional x-rays, hock clipping, and blood work.  I had expected him to be, but hearing that certainly made me proud 🙂

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Look at those sexy shaved legs!